India in the digital lighthouse Courtesy: World Economic Forum
31 March 2021

India in the digital Lighthouse

In March 2021, the World Economic Forum (WEF) announced the addition of 15 manufacturing facilities to the prestigious Global Lighthouse Network. Two Indian companies were on the list – the Tata Steel facility in Jamshedpur, and the ReNew Power facility in Hubli. This is twice the number of Indian companies on the list last year. Many more facilities will likely be added to the WEF list, as several prepare to graduate their manufacturing businesses to keep up with Industry 4.0.

Rajiv Bhatia_Image Courtesy: Gateway House
12 November 2020

India-SCO: New Platform, Common Ground

India will host the 19th meeting of the Council of Heads of Government on 30 November 2020. This will be the first meeting of the grouping’s second highest organ, hosted by India. The significance of the event lies in the timing – India’s relations with two fellow memberstates, China and Pakistan, are at an exceptionally low ebb; yet the clear message from the SCO Secretariat and other member-states is: India’s presence in the SCO is highly beneficial to the latter and should be fully leveraged to strengthen it as an important and upcoming intergovernmental organisation. This necessitates a fresh appraisal of options for India.

shutterstock_1799297029 Courtesy: Shutterstock
21 September 2020

China wins this TikTok round

With Oracle, Walmart and U.S. venture capitalists now holding the majority of TikTok Global’s shareholding, China’s closed digital world gets a breather, and the possibility of a truly open global Internet, gets a blow. China has won this round.

shutterstock_1752673730 Courtesy: Shutterstock
30 July 2020

A New World for India and the United States

The recent rush of U.S. capital into India’s digital future, and India’s recent structural reforms, is the impetus for an attractive collaboration between the U.S. and India. To really succeed, the U.S. will have to support India with the same kind of technical assistance and best practices in areas like regulation, distribution, and innovation, that it gave China. The alternative is for India to follow Europe’s regulatory model, which places less of an emphasis on job growth and innovation.

Image 2 - The Myth of Chinese Capitalism Courtesy: Gateway House
14 July 2020

The Myth of Chinese Capitalism

Dexter Roberts, Non-resident Senior Fellow, Asia Security Initiative, Atlantic Council & author of the newly-released book on the subject was in conversation with Manjeet Kripalani, Executive Director, Gateway House.

Image 2 - Pakistan - between Covid and China Courtesy: Gateway House
8 July 2020

Pakistan – between COVID and China

Tilak Devasher, Member, National Security Advisory Board was in conversation with Manjeet Kripalani, Executive Director, Gateway House. The discussion centered around Pakistan's management of COVID-19 and its relations with China.

Image 2 - Decoupling from China Courtesy: Gateway House
30 June 2020

Decoupling from China

Amit Bhandari, Fellow, Energy & Environment, Gateway House was in conversation with Blaise Fernandes, Director, Gateway House. This discussion was moderated by Manjeet Kripalani, Executive Director, Gateway House.

IMG_9738 Courtesy: Macmillan/Dexter Roberts
18 June 2020

The Myth of Chinese Capitalism

China’s dramatic political and economic rise over the past three decades has been well recorded. Less known is the effort of China's rural labourers and migrants, which has largely enriched the coastal elites, instead of creating the egalitarian, capitalist, society China espouses. Dexter Roberts’ book takes us deep into the story of China’s rise, and exposes this reality. Roberts chronicles the lives of the many rural folk he has met during two decades of work and travels in China. It gives the book a personal and compassionate note, with the authenticity of a hands-on China expert.

shutterstock_132894758 Courtesy: Shutterstock
25 May 2020

Globalisation: good-bye to the hype

Globalisation has resulted in the interdependence of nations through the largely unimpeded transmission of investment capital and information, and integrated business operations. The leading beneficiaries have been the global 1%, and China. While it is too late and not possible to roll back an interconnected world order, globalization as we know it will recede, as will China’s standing in the world.