shutterstock_765921100 (1) Courtesy: Shutterstock
16 October 2019

Powering hydrogen mobility for India

Decarbonising the transportation sector is an environmental priority globally, and hydrogen, the cleanest and most plentiful of fuels, is central to achieving this goal. If hydrogen mobility is actively pursued, India’s large reserves of gas hydrates and shale gas can be tapped for commercial use. Such a shift in choice of fuel will also ensure India’s energy security

shutterstock_83614519 Courtesy: Shutterstock
10 October 2019

Climate engineering vs. geoengineering

The United Nations’ Paris Agreement of 2015 had nations committing to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to slow the rise in global temperatures. But terrestrial geoengineering – or the use of “carbon capture” technologies and developing carbon sinks to remove gases already in the atmosphere – and atmospheric climate engineering are technologies which also seek to slow global warming

IMG_51561_small Courtesy: Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University
3 October 2019

Post-Abqaiq Saudi Arabia

The immediate panic in the aftermath of the missile attack on Saudi Aramco’s facility at Abqaiq underlines the still-critical role of the Kingdom to the world economy. The subsequent recovery of oil production – with no disruption – showed that Saudi Arabia is a reliable partner/guarantor of energy supplies. Our Energy and Environment fellow Amit Bhandari was in Riyadh recently for a conference, and describes a post-Abqaiq Saudi Arabia

48779842862_42f801ff25_z Courtesy: MEA/flickr
26 September 2019

PM Modi in Houston: balance and bonhomie

The Indian prime minister’s visit to the United States had both spectacle and substance, with the Houston event earlier this week casting a spotlight on the Indian American community. But the U.S.-India bilateral relationship is much more than a single event and negotiations on several issues will go on, says Ambassador Neelam Deo, Director, Gateway House, in this podcast

GAS-ENERGY-Cementing-the-Partnership Courtesy: eGov Magazine
12 September 2019

Cross-investing for economic security

India and Russia need to invest more in each other’s energy sectors. This will help both countries to secure their energy markets, while protecting India against high energy prices and enabling Russia to hedge against low energy prices. Such investments also can help both countries bypass sanctions on key military hardware suppliers based in Russia.

Cover with black border Courtesy: Gateway House
29 August 2019

Petro Dollar. Petro Yuan. Petro Rupee?

The global energy scenario has changed in every way – be it in demand, supply or energy type – in the last two decades. The only unchanged component has been the currency of energy trade: the U.S. Dollar. Lately, though, the Chinese Yuan has emerged as a challenger. Can the Indian Rupee be a third contender?

shutterstock_1042231621 Courtesy: Shutterstock
1 August 2019

A case for the petro rupee

India can catalyse trading in oil on its domestic exchanges, and thereby adjust global oil prices so they reflect the changing patterns of global trade. In the process, this can help Indian companies and government reduce the risks arising from high energy prices. And in the long run, it can give India a more central position in the global financial system

MethaneEconomy_Cover(A4) Courtesy: Gateway House
16 July 2019

The Methane Economy

The United Nations’ 2015 Paris Agreement called for the immediate sequestration of atmospheric anthropogenic greenhouse gases to help avert serious environmental degradation. India can take the lead in this because it is the second largest emitter of methane. Of all the natural greenhouse gases, methane is the hardiest. Technological advances are making it possible to crack methane into gaseous hydrogen and solid carbon on a commercial scale. Methane cracking can provide a steady supply of hydrogen for futuristic transportation and solid carbon materials — graphene, carbon nanotubes, synthetic diamonds — which are integral to the marine, aerospace and space industries. The commercial benefits apart, methane cracking will also go a long way in meeting the Paris Agreement’s climate change mitigation objectives. This paper offers some concrete recommendations that can help the government of India shape national legislation and global geoeconomic strategies

shutterstock_765921106 Courtesy: Shutterstock
11 July 2019

Making India a Methane Economy

India is the second largest emitter of methane in the world. But methane-cracking has enormous economic potential. It can help India become a high-technology manufacturing powerhouse by producing a steady supply of methane-derived, advanced carbon materials and hydrogen-energized transportation