global-commons-870_0 Courtesy: Global Environment Facility
15 August 2018

India in the Global Commons

Since Independence, India has been consumed by its domestic priorities. Now, with increasing integration with the world and a huge stake in global stability, it is time to focus on the global commons. India has a seat on the hightable to design and shape the rules for the governance of the global commons. In this special Independence Day Briefing, Gateway House examines India’s engagement with four global commons – technology, outer space, cyber and the oceans – and makes recommendations on how best they can be governed for our collective future.

GH_Carbon-Emissions-1970-2015 Courtesy: Gateway House
24 November 2016

Carbon emissions: from intention to action

November was a significant month for climate change negotiations: the Paris Agreement of 2015 came into effect, and at this year’s COP22, heads of state reaffirmed their commitment to a plan of action. Gateway House traces the history of climate change negotiations and CO2 emission trends over the last four and a half decades.

ONGC-kqh--621x414@LiveMint Courtesy: Livemint
4 August 2016

Securing oil: buy now, hold exploration

The fall in oil prices means it is now cheaper for ONGC to acquire discovered oil fields than to explore on its own. To profit from the changed dynamic, India needs to go big on a ‘buy’ strategy.

Khurshid in Iraq Courtesy: MEAphotogallery/ Flickr
28 June 2013

India finally reconnects with Iraq

In 2012, Iraq emerged as India’s second largest crude oil supplier thereby shifting focus back on bilateral relations. However, India’s historical and cultural connection with Iraq, as well as common geopolitical concerns, reveal that relations have the potential to go beyond oil

Courtesy: Tas50/WikimediaCommons
27 December 2012

Who will control the Antarctic?

In the past few years, the political map of Antarctica, a region rich in mineral-fuel resources, has changed immensely. How can the ongoing geopolitical polarization in this region have unfavourable global effects in the long run?

UN Photo Marco Castro_210x140 Courtesy: UNPhoto/MarcoDormino
12 April 2011

New trends in the management of upheaval

A new United Nations doctrine is revolutionising the manner in which Western powers achieve regime change. Under the pretext of “Responsibility to Protect” –as the doctrine is named –armed intervention does not depend on the aspirations of a populace but the facilitation of existing power equations