shutterstock_1540336541 Courtesy: Shutterstock
9 April 2020

Cybersecurity and privacy in the COVID-19 era

COVID-19 and remote working have resulted in a surge in demand for digital intermediaries, such as Zoom. Most of these are U.S.-based, with some having servers in China, which has aggravated privacy concerns. IT companies have responded quickly by fortifying themselves internally through a range of measures, but it is now time for India’s highly accomplished tech industry to devise secure, scalable platforms with India-based servers

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30 January 2020

Case for a Universal Declaration of Digital Rights

It is time to formulate a Universal Declaration of Digital Rights that upholds the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948. Life, liberty and security in the digital realm need the same protection today. Human beings’ rights to digital self-determination, including control of personal data, are also sacrosanct

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16 January 2020

NEST-ling new tech in foreign policy

The recently announced New and Emerging Strategic Technologies (NEST) Division of India’s Ministry of External Affairs is timely. It can become vital for India’s national technosecurity in the imminent Fourth Industrial Age if a new Cabinet Committee on Futuristic Science and Technologies is established along with it

IMG-20191125-WA0678 Courtesy: Gateway House
5 December 2019

Readiness for cyber warfare

India and Canada can collaborate in the realm of cybersecurity by devising a common set of rules for governing cyber space. Aaron Shull, Managing Director and General Counsel, Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), spoke to Gateway House on the sidelines of the India-Canada Track 1.5 Dialogue

shutterstock_302486273 Courtesy: Shutterstock
14 November 2019

China’s strategic tech depth in India

In India, China’s tech giant companies and venture capital funds have become the primary vehicle for investments in the country – largely in tech start-ups. This is different from other emerging markets where Chinese investments are mostly in physical infrastructure. Chinese FDI into India is small at $6.2 billion, but its impact is already outsized, given the increasing penetration of tech in India