Cover with black border Courtesy: Gateway House
29 August 2019

Petro Dollar. Petro Yuan. Petro Rupee?

The global energy scenario has changed in every way – be it in demand, supply or energy type – in the last two decades. The only unchanged component has been the currency of energy trade: the U.S. Dollar. Lately, though, the Chinese Yuan has emerged as a challenger. Can the Indian Rupee be a third contender?

MethaneEconomy_Cover(A4) Courtesy: Gateway House
16 July 2019

The Methane Economy

The United Nations’ 2015 Paris Agreement called for the immediate sequestration of atmospheric anthropogenic greenhouse gases to help avert serious environmental degradation. India can take the lead in this because it is the second largest emitter of methane. Of all the natural greenhouse gases, methane is the hardiest. Technological advances are making it possible to crack methane into gaseous hydrogen and solid carbon on a commercial scale. Methane cracking can provide a steady supply of hydrogen for futuristic transportation and solid carbon materials — graphene, carbon nanotubes, synthetic diamonds — which are integral to the marine, aerospace and space industries. The commercial benefits apart, methane cracking will also go a long way in meeting the Paris Agreement’s climate change mitigation objectives. This paper offers some concrete recommendations that can help the government of India shape national legislation and global geoeconomic strategies

India-CanadaPaper4_Cover Courtesy: Gateway House & CIGI
15 March 2019

Preparing for Climate Intervention Decision Making in the Global South: A Role for Canada and India

The use of climate intervention technologies has not taken into sufficient account the social dimensions of climate intervention research, which includes citizen participation and pooling of knowledge resources. To fill this lacuna, Canada and India can examine what participation in climate intervention research means in the context of an African country to be able to evolve a more international view; urge both countries to conduct national policy discussions on climate intervention research; and increase public awareness of climate intervention technologies

ClimateEngineering_GH_CIGI_Cover Courtesy: Gateway House & CIGI
28 February 2019

Making Terrestrial Geoengineering Technologies Viable: An Opportunity for India-Canada Climate Leadership

The use of terrestrial geoengineering techniques, such as carbon capture, is necessary to keep the rise in global temperatures below 1.5 degrees Celsius, as per the Paris Agreement’s targets. Terrestrial geoengineering is different from atmospheric climate engineering: the latter does not remove the very source of the increased greenhouse effect, which are anthropogenic greenhouse gases. India and Canada must collaborate on carbon capture and propose multilateral regulations for unethical atmospheric climate engineering