IMG-20191125-WA0379 Courtesy: Gateway House
5 December 2019

Green technologies’ win-win possibilities

Olaf Weber, Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), University of Waterloo Research Chair in Sustainable Finance, one of the participants in the India-Canada Track 1.5 Dialogue, on how green finance and economic development are not contradictory any more

16393293185_079f161578_c Courtesy: Flickr/MEA
28 November 2019

EAM’s statement on India-Canada Track 1.5 Dialogue

The India-Canada Track 1.5 Dialogue on Innovation, Growth and Prosperity, an initiative agreed upon in February 2018 by the two prime ministers, provides an opportunity for the bilateral relationship to grow through geopolitical convergence, greater economic collaboration and people-to-people interaction. A statement by External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar for the second edition of the Dialogue, held in Mumbai on 22 November 2019

India-CanadaPaper4_Cover Courtesy: Gateway House & CIGI
15 March 2019

Preparing for Climate Intervention Decision Making in the Global South: A Role for Canada and India

The use of climate intervention technologies has not taken into sufficient account the social dimensions of climate intervention research, which includes citizen participation and pooling of knowledge resources. To fill this lacuna, Canada and India can examine what participation in climate intervention research means in the context of an African country to be able to evolve a more international view; urge both countries to conduct national policy discussions on climate intervention research; and increase public awareness of climate intervention technologies

ClimateEngineering_GH_CIGI_Cover Courtesy: Gateway House & CIGI
28 February 2019

Making Terrestrial Geoengineering Technologies Viable: An Opportunity for India-Canada Climate Leadership

The use of terrestrial geoengineering techniques, such as carbon capture, is necessary to keep the rise in global temperatures below 1.5 degrees Celsius, as per the Paris Agreement’s targets. Terrestrial geoengineering is different from atmospheric climate engineering: the latter does not remove the very source of the increased greenhouse effect, which are anthropogenic greenhouse gases. India and Canada must collaborate on carbon capture and propose multilateral regulations for unethical atmospheric climate engineering

indias-global-energy-footprint Courtesy: Gateway House
14 February 2017

India’s global energy footprint

Trends in technology, geopolitics and geoeconomics have dramatically transformed the global energy scenario in the last two years. This means favourable conditions for import-dependent India, which must use the opportunities available to reduce its vulnerability to high energy prices. The jump in oil prices past the $60 mark suggests that India must act with alacrity. India’s Energy Footprint Map offers a profile of India’s global trade and investment in energy, and indicates what India can do to access cheap and reliable supplies

West_Texas_Pumpjack Courtesy: Wikipedia
13 April 2016

North America: petro state

The U.S. and Canada offer an opportunity for India to acquire large scale oil and gas fields in politically stable countries at a low price. A financial investment in energy companies will protect India against a rise in energy prices without raising concerns in host countries.

Modi-Harper Courtesy: Wikimedia commons
14 April 2015

India-Canada: partners on nuclear energy

Canada’s nuclear energy sector has a lot to offer India—the sale of uranium, joint development of technology and best practices on regulations. Nuclear energy co-operation is also an area in which Canada and India can make substantial advancements quickly. We should not let this opportunity slip by