Rohinton Medhora

Rohinton Medhora

Rohinton P. Medhora is president of the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), joining in 2012. He served on CIGI's former International Board of Governors from 2009 to 2014. Previously, he was vice president of programs at Canada’s International Development Research Centre. Rohinton received his doctorate in economics in 1988 from the University of Toronto, where he also subsequently taught for a number of years. In addition to his Ph.D., Rohinton earned his B.A. and M.A. at the University of Toronto, where he majored in economics. His fields of expertise are monetary and trade policy, international economic relations and development economics. Rohinton was recently named as a member of the Commission on Global Economic Transformation, co-chaired by Nobel economics laureates Michael Spence and Joseph Stiglitz. He serves on the boards of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, the McLuhan Foundation and the Partnership for African Social and Governance Research, and is on the advisory board of the WTO Chairs Program.

Recent projects

India-Canada Dialogue Launch-6383 Courtesy: Gateway House
2 May 2019 Gateway House

Reforming the multilaterals

Rohinton Medhora, President, Centre for International Governance Innovation, Canada, who was in Mumbai recently for the T20 conference hosted by Gateway House, spoke on the ways multilateral institutions can include developing countries’ agendas within their own.
Big Data - 6 Courtesy: PC Magazine
2 August 2018 Gateway House

Governance in the age of AI

A massive technological revolution is in the offing in the next 20 years, with its maximum impact being on the future of work. Artificial Intelligence and robotics will change how the labour market operates and governments will have to review ethical standards for emerging technologies. India can show the way in creating inclusive economic growth
Reversal of Globalisation2 Courtesy: Systemic Alternatives
8 February 2017 Gateway House

Is globalisation in reverse?

The contours of globalisation are being reshaped. The Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump mark a strong anti-globalisation sentiment even as leaders in China, India and Russia successfully marry nationalist rhetoric with a cleverly crafted overseas strategy, premised on the very tenets of globalisation. There seems to be a ‘pause’ in the unbalanced progress of globalisation of the last three decades—and this could have many positive outcomes