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14 November 2019

U.S. law tackles Chinese investments

The Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) is an inter-agency body which reviews in-bound foreign investments for their impact on national security. The Treasury Department recently proposed draft regulations, strengthening it. An analysis of the effect these amendments have had – and their applicability in an Indian context

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14 November 2019

China’s strategic tech depth in India

In India, China’s tech giant companies and venture capital funds have become the primary vehicle for investments in the country – largely in tech start-ups. This is different from other emerging markets where Chinese investments are mostly in physical infrastructure. Chinese FDI into India is small at $6.2 billion, but its impact is already outsized, given the increasing penetration of tech in India

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7 November 2019

Goodbye, RCEP

There have been mixed reactions to India’s not signing on to the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership. India is often criticised for abstaining from trade agreements and being a protectionist nation, but in fact, the reverse is true. The country’s trade to GDP ratio of 43% is higher than China’s 38% and the U.S.’ 27%. This shows how important trade is for India, particularly if it wants to reach the 2024 goal of being a $5- trillion economy.

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3 October 2019

TICAD 7’s agenda: engaging private enterprise

The Seventh Tokyo International Conference on African Development was a departure from earlier editions of it. Japan, which is changing tack as a competitor to China in Africa, held back from publicising the number of heads of state present to prevent any comparisons with other such forums and made no further commitments on Overseas Development Assistance. The accent, instead, was on increasing Japanese private sector engagement

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29 August 2019

Petro Dollar. Petro Yuan. Petro Rupee?

The global energy scenario has changed in every way – be it in demand, supply or energy type – in the last two decades. The only unchanged component has been the currency of energy trade: the U.S. Dollar. Lately, though, the Chinese Yuan has emerged as a challenger. Can the Indian Rupee be a third contender?

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1 August 2019

A case for the petro rupee

India can catalyse trading in oil on its domestic exchanges, and thereby adjust global oil prices so they reflect the changing patterns of global trade. In the process, this can help Indian companies and government reduce the risks arising from high energy prices. And in the long run, it can give India a more central position in the global financial system

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27 June 2019

Gateway House on the G20

The 2019 G20 Summit in Osaka on June 28-29, is the 14th meeting of the Group of 20 leaders. The G20 is the world’s most influential economic multilateral forum. It is the agenda-setting forum that develops and guides rules of global economic governance. Under the Japanese Presidency, this summit will be the first to discuss and establish the rules for the worldwide governance of data, including current hot-button issues like data localisation and data sovereignty. India has both a preparatory and a contributory role to play in the G20 this year. For in 2022, it will be the President of the G20. India must identify its agenda early on; its a weighty responsibility but also an opportunity to set the global economic agenda.