IORA photo Courtesy: Gateway House
2 March 2017

IORA summit: sharing commonalities

The two decade-old Indian Ocean Rim Association holds its first ever summit next week. Maritime safety and security in the region is a paramount concern as also enhanced trade, but will the Blue Economy be included as a priority? Another area of concern is devising modalities for cooperation with dialogue partners, such as the United States, China and Japan

CNS At GOIGD Courtesy: Gateway House
16 February 2017

GOIGD 2017: Special Address by Admiral Sunil Lanba

Admiral Sunil Lanba, Chief of Naval Staff, Indian Navy delivered the Special Address on 'Indo-Pacific: Possibilities and Portents' at India’s second Gateway of India Geoeconomic Dialogue conference in Mumbai, organised in association with the Ministry of External Affairs.

3W7A1100 Courtesy: Gateway House
14 February 2017

GOIGD 2017: Valedictory Address by Gen. (Retd) Dr. V.K. Singh

Hon'ble Gen. (Retd) Dr. V.K. Singh, Minister of State for External Affairs, Government of India delivered the Valedictory Address on Aligning Foreign Policy with Domestic Interests at India’s second Gateway of India Geoeconomic Dialogue conference in Mumbai, organised in association with the Ministry of External Affairs. Singh speech discussed the importance of the implementation of foreign and domestic policies to further domestic economic interests.

28912263963_0b75893744_h Courtesy: MEA/ Flickr
14 February 2017

Indo-Pacific: a scenario of possibilities

The Indo-Pacific region is home to some of the largest and most rapidly growing economies as also powerful military forces. Nuclear threats, international terrorism and climate change are some of the issues that define the region. Uncertainty dogs relations among the four nations in the top league—U.S., China, India and Japan—but what is emerging is a hawkish, policy stance from the U.S. as opposed to an isolationist outlook apprehended earlier

1200px-Malabar_07-2_exercise Courtesy: Wikipedia
14 February 2017

A democratic quadrilateral in Asia?

A strategic coming together of the U.S., Japan, Australia, and India was close to fruition some years ago, impelled initially by the tsunami of 2004. The spirit of the enterprise remains alive even now, and there are many merits in India joining the quad, but such an arrangement can skew existing Asian equations, jeopardising the Act East policy

3W7A1043 Courtesy: Gateway House
14 February 2017

India-Israel: potential for collaboration on defence and cybersecurity

In his interview, Rear Admiral (Retd.) Ophir Shoham discusses Israel’s liberal cybersecurity policies and the high levels of export in the cybersecurity sector. According to him, transfer of technology is imperative for Digital India, as for a country to become digital, Infrastructure is most important which is protected by cybersecurity. In the defence space, he mentions the close relationship India and Israel share despite it being a sensitive area. He prescribes a collaboration between the two countries to build weapon systems that they can use to customize defense equipment for the Indian defense system and the Israeli defense system.

3W7A1058 Courtesy: Gateway House
14 February 2017

India-Thales: transfer of technology and developing supply chains

In Alexis Dalem's interview he discusses areas on which Thales and India have collaborated in the past and can collaborate in the future, in the defense, security and aerospace spheres, and under the Make in India policy. He laid emphasis on Thales's policy of willingness for technology transfer and production in India and their ambition to co-develop products and export from India, since they have a strong belief in India's industrial competitiveness and skilled workforce. He further applauds Modi's recent FDI changes in India as it allows for this technology transfer, enables Thales to retain a certain level of control in their subsidiaries in India and creates an investment positive business environment.

Rohingya Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons
6 February 2017

Minority report: a bleak road ahead?

Even nearly 70 years after independence, the people of Myanmar are struggling to complete nation-building and resolve the Rohingya issue. Is the million-strong community an ethnic group native to Myanmar or is it of South Asian origin, and, therefore, a part of Bangladesh? Evading the issue may not hasten national reconciliation