QiO_Logos_RGB-1-02_WHITE-2 Courtesy: QiO Technologies
29 July 2021

QiO: Answering questions inside outcomes

UK-Pune based QiO Technologies is an industrial software analytics company that focuses on digital transformation. QiO differentiated itself by complying with and certifying its products with European GDPR standards, creating trust and a wider client-base. It offers a unique subscription plan based on investment returns, making it an attractive option for manufacturing MSMEs.

attributing cyber-attacks Courtesy: Shutterstock
15 July 2021

Attributing cyber-attacks

A ransomware attack recently targeted Kaseya, a software services company in the U.S., for $70 million, incapacitating hundreds of its clients globally. There is an increasing incidence of such attacks, with perpetrators targeting government agencies and high-tech companies, leading to considerable economic losses. How can governments mitigate these threats and attribute responsibility to those accountable?

sanctions and counter-sanctions Courtesy: Shutterstock
15 July 2021

Sanctions and counter-sanctions

For years, Western countries have used sanctions as a means of economic warfare against their adversaries. Now, China and Russia are utilising the same tactic against the West. The United Nations Security Council is paralysed by differences between the five permanent members, leaving the tools of unilateral sanctions and counter-sanctions to proliferate at the cost of UN-approved multilateral sanctions.

First,Space,Shuttle,Launch,On,April,12,,1981.,Astronauts,John Courtesy: Shutterstock
8 July 2021

Economic goals will drive space exploration

With the U.S.-led Artemis Accords gathering momentum, and China and Russia joining hands, space exploration is becoming economically important. Countries increasingly want to participate in the space exploration economy and are partnering with space superpowers that have aligned geopolitical and geoeconomic interests. India, too, must do the same, says Dr. Chaitanya Giri, Fellow, Space and Ocean Studies Programme.

BigTech Report (1) Courtesy: Gateway House
1 July 2021

Regulating Big Tech: A Balancing Act

Big Tech is powerful and its profits are growing - by 105% over the last year. It dominates economies. This raises concerns about data protection and privacy, anti-trust, fintech and the specific role of intermediaries. India is leading the way on fintech, but is behind several countries and institutions on digital rules. It is important to establish laws and rules to govern technology – whether domestic or through multilateral bodies – with the aim to strike the right balance between innovation and regulation.

a model for global data regulation Courtesy: Shutterstock
31 March 2021

A model for global data regulation

Individuals now generate copious amounts of personal data everyday – both online and offline. Devices and infrastructure extract data, which can be shared instantly across borders with diverse entities - without consent. It is imperative that countries come together to create regulations to protect individuals who are unable to control how their data is shared and processed. A model already exists in the Paris Climate Agreement.

OneWeb Courtesy: Gateway House
24 December 2020

India, OneWeb and the Queen’s stake

Bharti Global’s stake in OneWeb has given India lateral entry into this lucrative and newly-competitive global satellite-based internet services market. India and the U.K., the two stakeholders in this company, can build and sustain this collaboration through a well-thought-out bilateral space diplomacy agenda.

Chai Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons
26 October 2020

India must back Developing World in Space20

The Space20 is the newest sub-forum of the G20 initiated by Saudi Arabia, with the support of the United Nations Office of Outer Space Affairs. India, on its way to the G20 presidency in 2022, should set a comprehensive Space20 agenda for the democratization of outer space, whereby it can share its space growth story with the developing world and achieve its goal to become a global knowledge epicenter.

shutterstock_634271282 Courtesy: Shutterstock
8 October 2020

A compelling case for Digital Service Tax

The current notions of physical ‘permanent establishment’ or tangible locational nexus are not well-suited for the taxation of modern digital economy, especially for taxation of business income, rents or revenue creating activities. In a Covid-19 wrecked global economy, where government revenues are under severe stress, there is a compelling case for a market country or the value-creating jurisdiction to tax the income or rents attributable to the concerned market or location.