Kartik Ashta

Kartik Ashta

Researcher, International Law Studies Programme

Kartik Ashta is Researcher for International Law Studies Programme. A lawyer by training, Kartik has a BA LL. B (Hons) from National Law University, Delhi and a Masters in International Law (LL.M) from the  Fletcher School at Tufts University. Before joining Gateway House, he was part of the Protection Unit with the UNHCR - The United Nations Refugee Agency in Kosovo. He specialises in Refugee and Migration Law, International Humanitarian Law, Human Rights Law, and the Laws of the Sea.
Expertise

Public International Law, International Humanitarian Law, Quad

Last modified: June 3, 2021

Recent projects

China's Expanding Influence in the UN System_Gateway House_Report_2021 (1) Courtesy: Gateway House
27 May 2021 Gateway House

China’s Expanding Influence in the UN System

China has been steadily increasing its influence within the United Nations using a combination of increased funding, strategically placing its key officials and selecting the most influential agencies and bodies to lead. The clusters of agencies headed by China are directly and indirectly linked to its domestic agendas like the Belt and Road Initiative, Make in China 2025 and the rise of Chinese companies. The world is just starting to take notice - and so must India.
international criminal court: jurisdiction over non-members Courtesy: Shutterstock
8 April 2021 Gateway House

The ICC’s jurisdiction conundrum

On 3 March 2021, the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) at the Hague, commenced an official investigation into Israel and Palestinian Armed Groups' alleged war crimes committed in the occupied territories of Palestine since July 2014. Palestine, which referred the case, is a member of the ICC, but Israel is not. Does the ICC have any jurisdiction in these cases? Will US support for Israel play a role? The three instances in the table show precedents in similar matters.
a model for global data regulation Courtesy: Shutterstock
31 March 2021 Gateway House

A model for global data regulation

Individuals now generate copious amounts of personal data everyday – both online and offline. Devices and infrastructure extract data, which can be shared instantly across borders with diverse entities - without consent. It is imperative that countries come together to create regulations to protect individuals who are unable to control how their data is shared and processed. A model already exists in the Paris Climate Agreement.
gatewayhouse Courtesy: Shutterstock
27 January 2021 Gateway House

Revisiting India’s Agricultural Trade Policies

The Jan 26 riots by the protesting Punjab farmers, is a set back both to the reform of India's domestic agriculture sector, and to the country's external agriculture trade. Nevertheless, willing farmers and communities can improve their engagement with the market, start inter-state trade, and build the farming infrastructure necessary to prepare for a fully free agriculture market. This will ready India to fulfil its commitments and find its rightful place in the international trade system.
Quad image_ Courtesy: Shutterstock
10 December 2020

To formalize the Quad – or not

Should the Quad be formalized? It has evolved from a crisis response group in 2004 to a strategic partnership today between the four member-countries – India, the U.S., Australia and Japan. There are benefits and challenges to the institutionalisation of the Quad which require timely analysis, especially as the group has renewed vigour this year with the COVID-19 pandemic and China’s aggression in the Indo-Pacific region.