Courtesy: PMO
13 March 2012

India-Brazil: pioneers of a new development agenda

India and Brazil have declared inclusive development an imperative and have engineered creative solutions to meet their developmental challenges. But both also face many obstacles to equitable development. Can the upcoming BRICS Summit in New Delhi help drive a new development agenda?

Beware copy Courtesy: upton/Flickr
9 March 2012

Beware of cheap lending from China

While India’s mega-companies are only experiencing the beginning of Beijing’s accommodating bank policy, Brazil and Russia seem to have grown accustomed to Chinese money. Before they meet in New Delhi for the 2012 BRICS summit, it’s important to remember that China’s loans come with strings attached.

BRICS magazine Courtesy: Newsdesk
3 January 2012

BRICS: The 2012 New Delhi Summit

Alongside the 2012 BRICS Summit in Delhi, this special publication is a collection of articles that addresses important issues of the global agenda, the priorities of BRICS, the policies and competitive advantages of the participants, as well as BRICS institutionalization.

anna hazare 2 Courtesy: nazeah/Wikimediacommons - Ramesh Lalwani/Flickr
30 December 2011

2011’s Top Foreign Policy Cheers and Jeers

The year 2011 saw various events - the Arab Spring, anti- corruption protests, Europe's sovereign debt crisis - transform countries and reshape the world order. Gateway House takes a look at what these events mean for India, and presents India's top foreign policy cheers and jeers for the year.

Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)
13 December 2011

Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP)

Amidst myriad country groupings that already exist – BRICS, IBSA, APEC, SCO and many others – a new initiative in the Pacific is looking to integrate more powerful countries to form a multilateral free trade agreement – the Trans Pacific Partnership. How important is this towards the reshaping of trade and power?

monus wahhabi piece Courtesy: White House photo/WikimediaCommons
29 November 2011

NATO vs Shias: A geopolitical miscalculation

The Wahhabis, who now merit NATO backing, continue on their global mission of converting the Muslim Ummah to its relatively harsh and antediluvian ways of thinking and living. For NATO, this is a geopolitical miscalculation that will have tragic security consequences for the alliance within a decade.

Cleared for release by Joint Staff Public Affairs Courtesy: Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff/Flickr
18 November 2011

The ISI: U.S. backers run for cover

The 'double-dealing' of the U.S. and Pakistani army - all with the ambition of military dominance - has significantly aided various terrorist groups. After 26/11, there is no place to hide for the Mike Mullens and countless others who have been apologists for the Pakistan army and the state it controls.

bobs piece for 26,11 Courtesy: isafmedia/Flickr
18 November 2011

9/11 and 26/11: Are we any safer?

Last May, U.S. citizen David Headley confessed to being a spy for the Lashkar-e-Taiba. What no one has tackled yet is whether there are other Headleys out there whose actions threaten India, or any other country. Even with thousands of intelligence agencies scouting for terrorist activities, are we really safer?