1200px-Malabar_07-2_exercise Courtesy: Wikipedia
14 February 2017

A democratic quadrilateral in Asia?

A strategic coming together of the U.S., Japan, Australia, and India was close to fruition some years ago, impelled initially by the tsunami of 2004. The spirit of the enterprise remains alive even now, and there are many merits in India joining the quad, but such an arrangement can skew existing Asian equations, jeopardising the Act East policy

australia-uranium-mine Courtesy: mining.com
4 September 2014

India-Australia nuclear deal: a pivot point

This week Prime Minister Modi will meet his Australian counterpart Tony Abbott for the second time in two months. New Delhi and Canberra have already signed a civil nuclear deal which will supply much needed uranium to India’s reactors and remove a big thorn in the relationship between the two nations. The deal is the pivot to take the bilateral forward

Ior arc meaindia Courtesy: Ministry of External Affairs, India
5 November 2013

India: Regional net security provider

In the coming years, India’s greatest strategic challenge in the Indian Ocean region may not be the development of power projection but the quality of the strategic relationships that it can build in the region. The extents to which India will be recognised as a regional leader depend on these relationships.

smith antony aus def min Courtesy: Australian Government Department of Defence
7 June 2013

India-Australia: Aligning strategic spheres

Defence Minister A. K. Antony’s visit to Australia this week was a significant step forward in the defence relationship. In coming years an India-Australia partnership will be important for managing maritime security in the Indian Ocean and will also have implications for security in Southeast Asia and the Pacific

Manmohan - Abe MEA Courtesy: Ministry of External Affairs, India
30 May 2013

A new configuration to the East

During his visit to Japan, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh spoke of the need to increase bilateral consultations on strategic issues. This, and other moves, indicate new developments in India’s Look East Policy, with alternative security and economic scenarios for regional actors in the context of the rise of China