Narendra-Modi-Silicon-Valley-684x420 Courtesy: Twitter: Digital India Archives
19 May 2022

Digital public goods for the Indo-Pacific

With mass digitisation, India has proved that technology is not just for the educated, privileged, and wealthy. The country's open and secure digital public platforms can be significant for the Indo-Pacific, the world's most data-rich region. The Indian model is applicable because it is open-source, interoperable, auditable, and enshrines individual rights, ownership, and empowerment.

china-solomon Courtesy: Financial Times
21 April 2022

Economic and human security in the Indo-Pacific

China has established a dominant presence in the Indo-Pacific through exploitative economic engagements. This has destabilised smaller nations in the region and made them dependent on Chinese support. For a free and open Indo-Pacific, India must press its advantage in human and economic capacity building.

Logistics,And,Transportation,Of,Container,Cargo,Ship,And,Cargo,Plane Courtesy: Shutterstock
10 March 2022

India in the Resilient Supply Chain Initiative

Concerns of global supply chains being overdependent on China has shifted the focus to India. This became clear in 2021 when Australia, Japan and India together launched the Resilient Supply Chain Initiative. India must now leverage its unique position in the Indo-Pacific region by incorporating well-planned industrial clusters and models.

TDB_car_151021 Courtesy: TDB
24 February 2022

Enhancing Regional Financial Intermediation in the Indo-Pacific

Financial intermediaries are critical lubricants for business, growth and development. The Indo-Pacific countries are industrializing, but smaller nations lag behind economically. The Quad countries can aid the advancement of the financial architecture in the Indo-Pacific by helping to develop an ecosystem, modelled on the examples of Japan and India.

amit paper cover Courtesy: Gateway House
21 December 2020

India’s energy investments: A fresh approach

India’s investments in energy thus far have concentrated on buying stakes in oilfields in developing countries often at the risk of political unpredictability. With oil prices, and therefore oil company values, falling – India should revise this strategy and aim for better value and lower risk by making investments in companies in the developed world. This paper recommends investing in oil and gas assets in energy-rich developed countries like the U.S., Canada and Australia, to reduce India's vulnerability to future increases in energy prices. These should be made via a sovereign wealth fund (SWF), not the national oil companies. The SWF will be best served by acting as a financial investor, acquiring, only minority stakes, rather than aiming for management control.