Sifra_image Courtesy: Gateway House
12 November 2020

India and the SCO: Bound by Buddism

In November this year, India will be hosting the Shanghai Cooperation Council (SCO) exhibition “Shared Buddhist Heritage” to coincide with the SCO Council of Heads of Government Meeting and two Ministerial Level Meetings. This paper recommends a theme on India’s Buddhist legacy in the SCO, which ties together three important Buddhist historical narratives (based on archaeological evidence), that can add heft to India’s leadership in reviving people-to-people ties through Buddhism amongst the eight member nations

Ambika_Image Courtesy: Gateway House
12 November 2020

SCO: Time for a revised Charter

The expansion in membership of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) is an opportunity to review, possibly revise and widen the scope of its Charter to make it more suited to address the concerns of all its members, including new ones like India. This paper recommends what the changes in the SCO Charter ought to be by comparing it with the successful ASEAN charter.

shutterstock_1787861693 Courtesy: Shutterstock
21 October 2020

Riparian Governance in South Asia

The record of regional cooperation on rivers since India's independence in 1947 is one of several successes, with some contestations. In contrast to the past when governments strove to divide and share river waters, the endeavor has now shifted to thinking about comprehensive river basin development which makes the process even more complex. India’s policy on transboundary river governance must now also be aware of the increasing importance of Indo-Pacific in the global geopolitics.

18571132430_2b3b04c7c9_e Courtesy: Flickr
27 August 2020

Pakistan’s international terrorist hall of fame

On 18th August, Pakistan announced wide-ranging restrictions on prominent anti-India terrorist leaders. These steps are clearly aimed to prevent Pakistan from slipping into the black list of the Financial Action Task Force, where Pakistan is already grey-listed. Their implementation remains key as in the past, Islamabad's global anti-terrorism commitments have been abandoned once global scrutiny of its support to terrorist infrastructure, decreases or is distracted.

Junagadh_Map-01 Courtesy: Gateway House
24 August 2020

Pakistan should drop Junagadh claim

Pakistan’s recent claims on Junagadh is a response to its frustration that the big powers and Islamic world have failed to respond to India’s unilateral action in revoking Article 370 and incorporating Ladakh and Kashmir under New Delhi’s federal control. But the continuing claim is only damaging to Pakistan’s cause.

shutterstock_1767656477 Courtesy: Shutterstock
9 July 2020

Pakistan: between COVID-19 and China

Pakistan is suffering from a gravely mismanaged COVID-19 crisis and is under pressure from China to fulfil its commitments to the CPEC. Using COVID-19 as a cover, Pakistan is able to continue shirking its global responsibilities especially on containing terrorism. What does this mean for India, and for Pakistan’s own future?

Image 2 - Pakistan - between Covid and China Courtesy: Gateway House
8 July 2020

Pakistan – between COVID and China

Tilak Devasher, Member, National Security Advisory Board was in conversation with Manjeet Kripalani, Executive Director, Gateway House. The discussion centered around Pakistan's management of COVID-19 and its relations with China.

SanctionsCoverV2-04 Courtesy: Gateway House
30 April 2020

Can sanctions solve the Pakistan problem?

The shifting geopolitics of the COVID19 crisis might be an opportune time for India to consider new strategies for managing and curtailing Pakistan’s military aggression in the future. One policy tool used effectively by other countries is the imposition of economic sanctions. India needs to devise a comprehensive, multi-pronged approach.

SanctionsCoverV2-06(GreyBG)-01 Courtesy: Gateway House
30 April 2020

Devising an Indian policy on Sanctions for Pakistan

India must consider new strategies that can be put in place to manage Pakistan's ongoing military aggression and security threat. One policy tool that has been used effectively by many countries but remains unexplored by India is the imposition of sanctions. This paper analyses the feasibility of imposing sanctions on Pakistan and the strategies India should consider to execute this effectively. It makes recommendations on how to establish a legal framework, amend existing laws, include Indian stakeholders with business interests in Pakistan, get government departments to collaborate on implementation, and considers diplomatic measures India can undertake.