Gateway House Courtesy: Rajeshwari K/Gateway House
25 January 2013

“The EU is learning from its mistakes”

In the backdrop of the European Union’s (EU) economic crises, the international community’s focus has shifted towards Asia. Gateway House interviews renowned historian and scholar Timothy Garton Ash on the lessons Asia can learn from Europe, Britian’s role in the EU and political morality.

nicolas veron interview pic Courtesy: Nicolas Véron
20 November 2012

“Europe has lessons to learn from India”

The deterioration of growth prospects is at the core of the financial crisis in Europe. Can Europe successfully form a banking and monetary union? Gateway House interviews Nicolas Véron, a French economist, to discuss the repercussions of the financial crisis in Europe and the potential for Indo-EU cooperation.

green africa Courtesy: trendscout::/Flickr
4 October 2012

A Green Agenda for Africa

All the major economic forces in the world have come together in Africa in a new version of the Great Game. The competition for the continent’s resources will ultimately harm Africa unless Africa uses this opportunity to its advantage and to address its own serious problems.

angre2 Courtesy: Columbia/WikimediaCommons
4 September 2012

Kanhoji Angre: India’s first naval commander

In the 1700s, one man antagonized the European powers, and insisted on the Maratha Empire’s rights to taxation and sovereignty over Maharashtra’s coast. He was Kanhoji Angre, the head of the Maratha navy. How did he, 283 years ago, set an important precedent for the Subcontinent’s local powers?

Global Stability Map Courtesy: Gateway House
1 August 2012

Global Stability Map 2012

Gateway House prepared a Global Stability Map, using 20 differing indicators, to analyze the stability of 60 countries around the world. Using criteria that are important to the emerging economies of the world, the map provides an Indian perspective of the world today.

wall street 2 Courtesy: Fletcher6/WikimediaCommons
23 July 2012

The shadow of LIBORgate

As the revelations pile up after the LIBOR rigging incident, it seems Europe and Britain are more committed to enforcement action than America. Real conservatives believe fully in market capitalism, that prices must come from uncorrupted market signals. Could this start a sea-change for enforcement globally?

NATO afghan Courtesy: Open Democracy
18 June 2012

The return of the Pashtun problem and NATO withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014

The NATO withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014 should be done tactically so that it doesn't destabilize Pakistan. Despite having accepted Pakistani help in the past, the Taliban might empathize with Pakistani Pashtuns and spread the very secessionist tendencies which Pakistan’s Afghan policy was designed to prevent.

iran talks Courtesy: IAEA Imagebank/Flickr
8 June 2012

All to play for in Moscow

Ahead of nuclear talks between Iran and the P5+1 in Moscow, the West seems confident that sanctions will induce Iran to settle on its uranium enrichment. But rather than arriving at a negotiated settlement by applying the principle of reciprocity, the West may look to anaesthetize oil markets.

human rights Courtesy: Flickr/tao_zhyn
1 June 2012

Rethinking human rights

The failure of Western military interventions to bring peace raises questions about the effectiveness of human rights and calls for its redefinition. Instead of stigmatizing non-Western democracies that do not necessarily support intervention, the West should initiate an inclusive dialogue with these countries.

Courtesy: PIAZZA del POPOLO/Flickr
24 May 2012

EU austerity: room to wiggle

Momentous developments are taking place in Europe. In elections in Greece, France and Germany, Europeans expressed dissent against austerity policies adopted by their government to combat the economic crisis in Europe. How will these results affect the future of European policy-making?