jf19_cover_large2 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
13 February 2019

The Stealth Superpower

Although China does not want to usurp the United States’ position as the leader of a global order, its actual aim is nearly as consequential. As one Chinese official put it, “Being a great power means you get to do what you want, and no one can say anything about it.” In other words, China is trying to displace, rather than replace, the United States.

nd18_cover_large Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
3 December 2018

Beijing’s Nuclear Option

Experts estimate the likelihood of a U.S.-Chinese nuclear crisis as “somewhere between nil and zero.” This assurance is misguided. The United States' signature approach to conventional warfare would be a potential recipe for nuclear escalation.

so18_cover_large_0 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
1 October 2018

Battlefield Internet

The immediate threat is more corrosive than explosive. States are using the tools of cyberwarfare to undermine the very foundation of the Internet: trust. The result is that an arena that the world relies on for economic and informational exchange has turned into an active battlefield.

Hi Roboto_FA Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
27 July 2015

China’s Soft-Power Push: The Search for Respect

As China goes global it is making a concerted effort at improving its international image and boosting its soft power. But is this strategy translating into an improvement of its soft power quotient?

China Now Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
4 May 2015

Embracing China’s “New Normal”

It is clear by now that China’s economy is set to slow in the years to come, although economists disagree about how much and for how long.

The Problem With the Pivot Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
30 November 2012

The Problem With the Pivot

The Obama administration plans to restrain Chinese belligerence by reinforcing U.S. military and diplomatic links to the Asia-Pacific. However, in order to avoid further Chinese resistance to its policies, the U.S. must look for possible avenues of cooperation with the country.

Broken BRICs Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
30 October 2012

Broken BRICs

There’s been much talk about the “the rise of the rest,” with Brazil, Russia, India, and China leading the charge. However, few countries can sustain unusually fast growth for a decade, and even fewer, for more than that. As the boom years begin to end, the international order won’t change as much as expected.