jf19_cover_large2 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
13 February 2019

The Stealth Superpower

Although China does not want to usurp the United States’ position as the leader of a global order, its actual aim is nearly as consequential. As one Chinese official put it, “Being a great power means you get to do what you want, and no one can say anything about it.” In other words, China is trying to displace, rather than replace, the United States.

nd18_cover_large Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
3 December 2018

Beijing’s Nuclear Option

Experts estimate the likelihood of a U.S.-Chinese nuclear crisis as “somewhere between nil and zero.” This assurance is misguided. The United States' signature approach to conventional warfare would be a potential recipe for nuclear escalation.

so18_cover_large_0 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
1 October 2018

Battlefield Internet

The immediate threat is more corrosive than explosive. States are using the tools of cyberwarfare to undermine the very foundation of the Internet: trust. The result is that an arena that the world relies on for economic and informational exchange has turned into an active battlefield.

ja18_cover_small Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
29 August 2018

The People’s Authoritarian

The psychology of Putin, the ideology of his regime, and the machinery received exhaustive attention in the West. The Russian people, however, remain poorly understood.

Foreign affairs Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
28 October 2014

Promises to Keep

The Millennium Development Goals are set to expire at the end of 2015. The time is near for world leaders to make some hard choices, to decide on new targets which will offer the greatest returns on investment

Foreign Affairs March 2014 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
4 April 2014

Eastern Europe Goes South

Many eastern European states who are part of the EU and were admitted only after being deemed compliant with the Copenhagen criteria have seen political parties in these countries become increasingly illiberal

Broken BRICs Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
30 October 2012

Broken BRICs

There’s been much talk about the “the rise of the rest,” with Brazil, Russia, India, and China leading the charge. However, few countries can sustain unusually fast growth for a decade, and even fewer, for more than that. As the boom years begin to end, the international order won’t change as much as expected.

foreign affairs november issue cover Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
1 November 2011

Is Indonesia Bound for the BRICs?

As Indonesia hosts a number of high-level summits this year, it looks set to take its place among the world’s economic superstars. But celebrations are premature: although Indonesia has made great strides, its gains are reversible. To continue to prosper, Jakarta must address rampant corruption and poor governance

cover1 (1 of 1) Courtesy:
1 September 2010

Not Ready for Prime Time

The world’s leading international institutions may be outmoded, but Brazil, China, India, and South Africa are not ready to join the helm. Their shaky commitment to democracy, human rights, nuclear nonproliferation, and environmental protection would only weaken the international system’s core values.