Rajiv Bhatia

Rajiv Bhatia

Distinguished Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies Programme

Ambassador Rajiv Bhatia is a Distinguished Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies Programme at Gateway House. As Director General of the Indian Council of World Affairs (ICWA) from 2012-15, he played a key role in strengthening India's Track-II research and outreach activities. During a 37-year innings in the Indian Foreign Service (IFS), he served as Ambassador to Myanmar and Mexico and as High Commissioner to Kenya and South Africa. He dealt with a part of South Asia, while posted as Joint Secretary in the Ministry of External Affairs. A prolific columnist, he also delivers lectures on foreign policy issues in India and abroad. He was Senior Visiting Research Fellow during 2011-13 at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS), Singapore. He holds a Masters degree in political science from Allahabad University. His book India-Myanmar Relations: Changing contours (Routledge) has received critical acclaim.
Expertise

Myanmar, East Asia, South Asia, Indian Ocean, Africa, Regional Groupings, Indian Foreign Policy and Diplomacy

Last modified: November 23, 2017

Recent projects

IORA photo Courtesy: Gateway House
2 March 2017 Gateway House

IORA summit: sharing commonalities

The two decade-old Indian Ocean Rim Association holds its first ever summit next week. Maritime safety and security in the region is a paramount concern as also enhanced trade, but will the Blue Economy be included as a priority? Another area of concern is devising modalities for cooperation with dialogue partners, such as the United States, China and Japan
indonesia india Courtesy: MEA/Flickr
22 February 2017 Gateway House

India-Indonesia: matching word with deed

The optimal potential of the India-Indonesia relationship remains untapped. The Eminent Persons’ Group has advised the two governments to elevate the existing relationship to a “New Comprehensive Strategic Partnership”. Will practice follow precept?
28912263963_0b75893744_h Courtesy: MEA/ Flickr
14 February 2017 Gateway House

Indo-Pacific: a scenario of possibilities

The Indo-Pacific region is home to some of the largest and most rapidly growing economies as also powerful military forces. Nuclear threats, international terrorism and climate change are some of the issues that define the region. Uncertainty dogs relations among the four nations in the top league—U.S., China, India and Japan—but what is emerging is a hawkish, policy stance from the U.S. as opposed to an isolationist outlook apprehended earlier
Rohingya Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons
6 February 2017 Gateway House

Minority report: a bleak road ahead?

Even nearly 70 years after independence, the people of Myanmar are struggling to complete nation-building and resolve the Rohingya issue. Is the million-strong community an ethnic group native to Myanmar or is it of South Asian origin, and, therefore, a part of Bangladesh? Evading the issue may not hasten national reconciliation
28909667344_cad7ec10cc_k Courtesy: MEA/flickr
4 January 2017 Gateway House

Acting East: what does 2017 hold in store?

The year 2017 may change some equations in the East Asian region. Will the near parity that the U.S. and China currently share turn into a keener contest? Will strained relations between India and China persist? Donald Trump’s election as the next U.S. president casts the spotlight squarely on these inter-state relationships
31392385676_97ed4ec6cb_z Courtesy: MEA/flickr
7 December 2016 Gateway House

The Arthashastra in Modi’s India

In Modi’s worldview, bolder than that of his predecessors, India has a bigger place than envisaged before. Consonant with this, the prime minister’s foreign policy mirrors the Arthashastra’s emphasis on pragmatic and intelligent use of power, informed by knowledge and the larger cause of the people. Has it been successful so far?
China-SriLanka-Title Card Courtesy: Gateway House
1 December 2016 Gateway House

Chinese investments in Sri Lanka

China is the largest investor in Sri Lanka today, with funding and investment of nearly $15 billion. Gateway House tracks the Chinese money trail to Sri Lanka-- where it lands, where it stays--and assesses its depth. This is the second in the Gateway House Series on Chinese investments in South Asia.