foreign affairs november issue cover Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
1 November 2011

Is Indonesia Bound for the BRICs?

As Indonesia hosts a number of high-level summits this year, it looks set to take its place among the world’s economic superstars. But celebrations are premature: although Indonesia has made great strides, its gains are reversible. To continue to prosper, Jakarta must address rampant corruption and poor governance

foreign affairs september issue_0 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
1 October 2011

The Inevitable Superpower

Is China poised to take over from the United States as the world’s leading economy? Yes, judging by its GDP, trade flows, and ability to act as a creditor to the rest of the world. In fact, China’s economic dominance will be far greater and come about far sooner than most observers realize.

US-India: Strategic Partners with a Limitless Future
15 September 2011

US-India: Strategic Partners with a Limitless Future

India and the United States have grown close very quickly over the last decade. Their commitment towards the war on terror, pursuit of joint energy security, and the prevention of the proliferation of nuclear weaponry are some on a long list of common goals.

Courtesy: Biswarup Ganguly/wikimediacommons
11 September 2011

Carbon Capture and Green Technology

While carbon capture fitted coal plants are opening all over the world, the global demand for cheap energy is climbing. The initial investment for carbon capture technologies, though, is high, and green technologies are struggling to have an impact on pollution levels.

foreign affairs september issue Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
31 August 2011

Afghanistan’s Ethnic Puzzle

In 2001, fearing ethnic strife, the international community pushed for a strong central government in Kabul. But such fears fostered a system of regional and ethnic patronage. To correct matters, the U.S. should de-emphasize Afghanistan’s ethnic fault lines and push for more devolved and inclusive governance.

pragati Courtesy: Pragati
5 August 2011

After the Great Earthquake

Both Tokyo and New Delhi see each other as reliable partners, and continue to do so after the Japanese earthquake and nuclear disaster. The Japan-India relations in the post-disaster environment must be understood in terms of humanitarian, economic and strategic dimensions.