Sagnik Chakraborty

Sagnik Chakraborty

Former Researcher, Cybersecurity Studies Programme and Manager, Management Office, Gateway House

Sagnik Chakraborty is a Researcher in Cybersecurity and Manager of the Management Office at Gateway House. His work focuses on technology and national security. A software programmer by profession, with more than nine years’ experience in the IT industry, he was with Tata Consultancy Services prior to joining Gateway House. He has held various roles in his IT career, starting from software developer to consultant to an operations and product manager. He is a graduate in physics from Fergusson College, Pune. His areas of research interest are cyber security, digital black markets, digital payment systems, messaging platforms, business analytics and disruptive technologies.
Expertise

Cyber security, business analytics, digital black markets, digital payment systems, messaging platforms

Last modified: June 10, 2021

Recent projects

DRISHTI AI Courtesy: LinkedIn | Drishti
10 June 2021 Gateway House

Drishti: Foresight to a digital manufacturing future

Using computer vision and AI to capture factory-wide data of human operators, Drishti Technologies co-relates human actions to line efficiencies, bottlenecks and root-cause analysis. Indian manufacturers operating at the lower end of the automation curve can use this combination to improve productivity, safety and quality by a deep-dive into human-action analytics.
c4i4 Courtesy: C4i4
20 May 2021 Gateway House

C4i4 Pune: Taking MSMEs to Industry 4.0

C4i4 is a part of the Government of India's Samarth Udyog initiative, and aims to hand-hold micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in the journey towards digitisation. Though MSMEs account for 45% of manufacturing output and 40% of exports, almost 90% of them lack access to markets beyond their limited geography. C4i4 helps them scale productivity and quality, and compete in global markets.
Source: Piramal Glass Courtesy: Piramal Glass
15 April 2021 Gateway House

Piramal Glass: Breaking manufacturing myths

In Dec 2020, U.S. private equity firm Blackstone acquired a controlling stake in Piramal Glass, in recognition of its inherent business value and accelerated digital journey. The plant in Kosamba, Gujarat, is an export powerhouse which has adopted digital technologies like IoT and cloud, and is a lodestar for brownfield facilities looking to become globally competitive, data-driven, and Industry-4.0 enabled. Early digital innovation helped restore plant-wide operations within a week of the COVID-19 pandemic, whilst adhering to stringent regulatory norms and workforce restrictions.
India in the digital lighthouse Courtesy: World Economic Forum
31 March 2021 Gateway House

India in the digital Lighthouse

In March 2021, the World Economic Forum (WEF) announced the addition of 15 manufacturing facilities to the prestigious Global Lighthouse Network. Two Indian companies were on the list – the Tata Steel facility in Jamshedpur, and the ReNew Power facility in Hubli. This is twice the number of Indian companies on the list last year. Many more facilities will likely be added to the WEF list, as several prepare to graduate their manufacturing businesses to keep up with Industry 4.0.
learning from bangladesh Courtesy: Shutterstock
25 March 2021 The Indian Express

Learning from Bangladesh

This month marks the beginning of triple celebrations in Bangladesh, including the 50th anniversary of its independence, for which Prime Minister Modi will be traveling to Dhaka as the guest of honour. There is much to celebrate: A country that began as a case study for development is now on top of the global GDP charts. The springboard was achieved through a thriving textiles industry, women's workforce participation, micro finance, liberal investment policies. There is much to learn from this neighbour.
industrial cybersecurity: Preventing and mitigating attacks Courtesy: Shutterstock
17 March 2021 Gateway House

Industrial Cybersecurity: Preventing and mitigating attacks

The growth of digital interconnectedness between the factory floor and the internet has led to a corresponding growth of potential risks with both humans and machinery susceptible to manipulation. This has deep implications for the safety of personnel, plants and machinery, and profits.

digital manufacturing in india Courtesy: Gateway House
11 March 2021 Gateway House

Digital Manufacturing in India

Digital manufacturing is the next wave of business globalisation, which, post-pandemic is not just blind automation to save costs but the smart use of digital tools to modernise industry and create good quality jobs. Digital manufacturing is the next leap for India’s tech leadership - the first being the software outsourcing movement in the 1990s. This time around, government incentives are aligning with industry interests. It offers India a chance to reposition itself globally, and play a leadership role.
tata steel: lighthouse for indian manufacturers Courtesy: Shutterstock
11 March 2021 Gateway House

Tata Steel: Lighthouse for Indian Manufacturers

Tata Steel is one of the few global companies on the prestigious Global Lighthouse Network for its advanced digital manufacturing systems - and it was the first Indian company on the list. The vision of a digitally integrated manufacturing facility was introduced when the Tata Steel Kalinganagar plant (TSK) was conceptualized in 2006. The subsequent implementation and continuous upgrade of the facility has made it a global benchmark. This case study on TSK's journey can guide other companies to overcome challenges in upgrading systems, using artificial intelligence and big data analytics to increase efficiency and drive innovation.
covid-19: impact on india's digital manufacturing Courtesy: Shutterstock
11 March 2021 Gateway House

COVID-19: Impact on India’s digital manufacturing

COVID-19 has forced India and its manufacturers to quickly step up their adoption of digital manufacturing processes. There are four elements of this ecosystem already in place – the digital infrastructure, government schemes, academic learning, and a burst of start-ups. This, supported by key policy decisions by the Indian government, will propel Indian manufacturing to higher levels of efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness.