CableMap-web Courtesy: Gateway House
5 April 2018

Version 1: China’s strategic edge in covert communications

China is steadily deploying state-of-the-art communications systems to connect its strategic and economic assets in Asia. It is then linkingthe Asian mainland to Africa, and Africa to South America. The investment spree is rapidly making Beijing a major player in global telecommunications – and ‘informationisation warfare’.

Gateway House's research map on Chinese investments in Pakistan. Researched by Amit Bhandari and Chandni Jindal. Courtesy: Gateway House
30 November 2017

Pakistan: A Reckless Mortgage

The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor is a strategic play by China disguised as an economic corridor. It may bring some economic benefits to Pakistan in the short run, but will almost certainly cost the country – and India – a big political price in the long run

16CHINATRUMP-facebookJumbo Courtesy: New York Times
13 July 2017

2016, the hinge year

Three epoch-making events in 2016 are continuing to have global repercussions. They were: Brexit, China’s rubbishing of the July verdict of the Permanent Court of Arbitration after it rejected its claims on disputed islands in the South China Sea, and Trump’s election. This article, the prologue to a book-in-progress, The Hinge Year – Geopolitical Dislocations and Dispersals, outlines how these events intersect with transformed geoeconomic realities

Ghizer_Gilgit-baltistan Courtesy: Wikimedia Commons
12 April 2017

Gilgit-Baltistan: Pakistan’s changed calculations

A Pakistani committee has recommended to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif that Gilgit-Baltistan should be declared the country’s fifth province. For 70 years Pakistan has avoided integrating its occupied parts of Kashmir for fear of damaging its legal position. That calculation may now have changed

IMG_0086 Courtesy: Gateway House
14 December 2016

Indian foreign policy: a paradigm shift?

In the last seven decades since independence, successive prime ministers have ushered in changes in India’s foreign policy in response to shifting global geopolitical dynamics, aggregating transformation in bilateral relations. This overview places the past against the changes being brought in by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, a more forceful foreign policy practitioner than his predecessors

IMG_9941 Courtesy: The Economist
6 December 2016

Geoeconomic dilemma in realigning Asia

India may be less dependent on the Chinese market than some other countries in the region, but it too wants Chinese investment—and this ambivalence has been evident in India’s varying approach to the AIIB and OBOR. To balance this dilemma in an increasingly complex Asia, India must work with others, in particular with European countries