Manjeet Kripalani

Executive Director, Gateway House

AllenSolly_210x140_0Manjeet Kripalani is the co-founder of Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations, and acts as the executive director of the institution. Prior to the founding of Gateway House, Kripalani was India Bureau chief of Businessweek magazine from 1996 to 2009. During her extensive career in journalism (Businessweek, Worth and Forbes magazines, New York), she has won several awards, including the Gerald Loeb Award, the George Polk Award, Overseas Press Club and Daniel Pearl Awards.       Kripalani was the 2006-07 Edward R. Murrow Press Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York, which inspired her to found Gateway House. Her political career spans being the deputy press secretary to Steve Forbes during his first run in 1995-96 as Republican candidate for U.S. President in New Jersey, to being press secretary for the Lok Sabha campaign for independent candidate Meera Sanyal in 2008 and 2014 in Mumbai. Kripalani holds two bachelor’s degrees from Bombay University (Bachelor of Law, Bachelor of Arts in English and History) and a master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University, New York. She sits on the executive board of Gateway House and is a member of the Rotary Club of Bombay. Click here to download high-res image
Expertise

Business, geopolitics, media

Last modified: December 21, 2017

Recent projects

Brics_Summit_-_2012 copy Courtesy: Saurabh Das/AP Photo
30 March 2012 Gateway House

BRICS: Moving in the right direction?

The 4th BRICS Summit in New Delhi has brought a new dimension to emerging markets. The author explains why the summit was perhaps the most significant of the BRICS meetings so far – and one that should have the developed world really worried about their eroding position at the top of the global heap.
Seagate_Wuxi_China_Factory_Tour copy Courtesy: Robert Scoble/Flickr
9 March 2012 Gateway House

China and India: slowing growth, stalling growth

After decades of impressive growth, China and India are slowing down; but the two situations couldn't be more different. The authors explain why the economic situation of these two emerging countries cannot be compared and why it's time for India to reform or get left behind.
mayawati Courtesy:
2 March 2012 Gateway House

The Makeover of Mayawati

Uttar Pradesh (UP) is going to the polls this month and the results will have implications even beyond India. However, Mayawati, the Chief Minister of UP, will encounter big challenges for re-election as the state faces major problems such as poverty and an inefficient education structure.
IndianExpress Courtesy: Indian Express
2 March 2012 Indian Express

UP, yesterday and tomorrow

Studying Mayawati's legacy in Uttar Pradesh, Manjeet Kripalani argues that despite pervasive corruption in the state , Mayawati has been successful in doing two things - instilling pride in the Dalit and ensuring that the benefits of the poverty programmes reach the poor.
Courtesy:
19 February 2012 Gateway House

UP: The Four-way fight

The 2012 elections in Uttar Pradesh are proving to be a four-way fight, where votes may get split evenly between the four main parties. However, Mayawati, of the ruling-BSP party, has her people listening rapt with attention.
Courtesy:
17 February 2012 Gateway House

UP: Changing aspirations, at last

Its election time in Uttar Pradesh (UP) – India’s largest state, with a population of more than 200 million. Who will represent this vast land that contributes to 8% of the country’s GDP? Manjeet Kripalani travels through UP, writing about the state's fast-changing political landscape and its hopeful people.
Sonia_Gandhi Courtesy: Yann/WikimediaCommons
4 August 2011 Gateway House

Gandhi dynasty: Politics as usual

As Sonia Gandhi receives medical treatment in the U.S., foreign - and not Indian - media reported about the leader of the Congress Party. Can Indians hope that the party will have the maturity to elect one from amongst itself or will the limp Indian opposition cohere into a credible force?