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10 October 2019, Gateway House

Climate engineering vs. geoengineering

The United Nations’ Paris Agreement of 2015 had nations committing to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to slow the rise in global temperatures. But terrestrial geoengineering – or the use of “carbon capture” technologies and developing carbon sinks to remove gases already in the atmosphere – and atmospheric climate engineering are technologies which also seek to slow global warming

Fellow, Space and Ocean Studies Programme

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The United Nations’ Paris Agreement of 2015 had nations committing to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases to slow the rise in global temperatures, but they also acknowledged that emissions-reduction alone is inadequate as a solution.  Using “carbon capture” technologies and developing carbon sinks to remove gases already in the atmosphere – a form of terrestrial geoengineering – can help achieve the Paris pact’s goal of keeping the global average surface temperature from rising more than the 1.5 degrees Celsius. In contrast, atmospheric climate engineering seeks to slow global warming by altering local weather patterns. This infographic on the two technologies explains their pros and cons

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Terristrial Geoengineering_9Apr

 

Chaitanya Giri is Fellow, Space and Ocean Studies Programme, Gateway House.

Designed by Daniella Singh, Design Associate, Gateway House.

This infographic was exclusively created for Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations. You can read more exclusive content here.

This article was exclusively written for Gateway House: Indian Council on Global Relations. You can read more exclusive content here.

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