The Problem With the Pivot Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
30 November 2012

The Problem With the Pivot

The Obama administration plans to restrain Chinese belligerence by reinforcing U.S. military and diplomatic links to the Asia-Pacific. However, in order to avoid further Chinese resistance to its policies, the U.S. must look for possible avenues of cooperation with the country.

Broken BRICs Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
30 October 2012

Broken BRICs

There’s been much talk about the “the rise of the rest,” with Brazil, Russia, India, and China leading the charge. However, few countries can sustain unusually fast growth for a decade, and even fewer, for more than that. As the boom years begin to end, the international order won’t change as much as expected.

foreing affairs sept_1 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
9 October 2012

Government, Geography, and Growth

Jeffrey D. Sachs argues that the mono-causal analysis of the book, 'Why Nations Fail,’ – that economic development hinges on a country’s political institutions – ignores important factors (such as geography) that can also affect growth.

foreing affairs sept_0 Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
28 August 2012

Stimulus or Reform?

Since weak demand is at the heart of the recession, governments need to enact stimulus programs along with structural reforms, argues Menzie Chinn. Structural reforms don’t always work out, writes Karl Smith. Raghuram Rajan demurs.

Bucking Beijing: An Alternative U.S. China Policy Courtesy: Foreign Affairs
27 August 2012

Bucking Beijing: An Alternative U.S. China Policy

Until now, the U.S.-China policy has been driven by a blend of engagement and balancing. The Obama administration’s concentration on ‘engagement’ has done nothing to halt Beijing’s military build-up. The next administration should work towards bolstering the ‘balancing’ half of Washington’s strategic equation.