1200px-Malabar_07-2_exercise Courtesy: Wikipedia
23 March 2017

A democratic quadrilateral in Asia?

A strategic coming together of the U.S., Japan, Australia, and India was close to fruition some years ago, impelled initially by the tsunami of 2004. The spirit of the enterprise remains alive even now, and there are many merits in India joining the quad, but such an arrangement can skew existing Asian equations, jeopardising the Act East policy

e92550d47b6d4ed5ad131f474187f8a7_18 Courtesy: Al Jazeera
6 March 2017

The Trump challenge: unpredictability as norm

Forecasting uncertainty is a full-fledged task for security and foreign policy analysts, but when countries resort to being unpredictable then it is likely to backfire. Uncertainty about his next course of action seems to be Trump’s defining characteristic. How India will manage this to better relations will be critical

India's Foreign Secretary Subrahmanyam Jaishankar (L) and US Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson Courtesy: AFP
6 March 2017

India-U.S.: continued ‘solid’ footing

Foreign Secretary Jaishankar’s third visit to the United States since Donald Trump's election is an indication of India’s commitment to engage with all-quarters in Washington with its full diplomatic might. Despite the current situation of concern due to the H-1B visa and the recent shooting of an Indian in Kansas, initial soundings are reassuring and positive.

trump Courtesy: Wikipedia Commons
28 February 2017

Trump: overturning the status quo

President Trump has moved to deliver on his campaign promises with rare alacrity: his executive actions cover everything from policies on trade and energy to bringing back manufacturing to America. But he has also been walked back on some of his explosive assertions while ambiguity looms large over several issues

Donald_Trump_swearing_in_ceremony Courtesy: Wikipedia
9 February 2017

The West and the rest: resetting the order

There is a stark divergence between how the West views the world and how those outside it do. It is possible to oversimplify the equation, to portray the West as cynically self-interested. The West and countries like India need to reach a shared understanding of how the liberal international order can be reformed so it may be salvaged

U.S. President Donald J. Trump, former U.S. President Barack Obama and their wives bid farewell to each other during the departure ceremony during at the 58th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C., Jan. 20, 2017. More than 5,000 military members from across all branches of the armed forces of the United States, including reserve and National Guard components, provided ceremonial support and Defense Support of Civil Authorities during the inaugural period. (DoD photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Marianique Santos) Courtesy: Wikipedia
9 February 2017

Bilateralism: a new Bretton Woods order?

Trump’s pronouncements about his intentions to challenge the direction and substance of America’s post World War II global ‘liberal’ order---terming institutions, like NATO, obsolete and pulling out of trade agreements, like TPP---reveal a preference for political-style deal making

Reversal of Globalisation2 Courtesy: Systemic Alternatives
8 February 2017

Is globalisation in reverse?

The contours of globalisation are being reshaped. The Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump mark a strong anti-globalisation sentiment even as leaders in China, India and Russia successfully marry nationalist rhetoric with a cleverly crafted overseas strategy, premised on the very tenets of globalisation. There seems to be a ‘pause’ in the unbalanced progress of globalisation of the last three decades—and this could have many positive outcomes

Donald_Trump_signs_Executive_Orders_January_2017 Courtesy: Wikipedia Commons
6 February 2017

Trade in the era of de-globalisation

Trump promises to reform the post World War II global order. Neelam Deo discusses how India can benefit from the changes Trump will cause in the existing trade structure as well as the transformation of trade networks in Europe after Brexit

Neelam 1 Courtesy: Gateway House
25 January 2017

How Trump will reconfigure geopolitics

Ambassador Neelam Deo delivered this speech at the grand finale of ‘The Mind Games’ – a platform for talent development & idea generation at Mahindra Partners on January 18, 2017. Ambassador Deo’s speech focuses on the disruption of the post-Cold War global framework to be caused by Trump’s foreign policy changes