Donald_Trump_swearing_in_ceremony Courtesy: Wikipedia
9 February 2017

The West and the rest: resetting the order

There is a stark divergence between how the West views the world and how those outside it do. It is possible to oversimplify the equation, to portray the West as cynically self-interested. The West and countries like India need to reach a shared understanding of how the liberal international order can be reformed so it may be salvaged

U.S. President Donald J. Trump, former U.S. President Barack Obama and their wives bid farewell to each other during the departure ceremony during at the 58th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C., Jan. 20, 2017. More than 5,000 military members from across all branches of the armed forces of the United States, including reserve and National Guard components, provided ceremonial support and Defense Support of Civil Authorities during the inaugural period. (DoD photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Marianique Santos) Courtesy: Wikipedia
9 February 2017

Bilateralism: a new Bretton Woods order?

Trump’s pronouncements about his intentions to challenge the direction and substance of America’s post World War II global ‘liberal’ order---terming institutions, like NATO, obsolete and pulling out of trade agreements, like TPP---reveal a preference for political-style deal making

Reversal of Globalisation2 Courtesy: Systemic Alternatives
8 February 2017

Is globalisation in reverse?

The contours of globalisation are being reshaped. The Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump mark a strong anti-globalisation sentiment even as leaders in China, India and Russia successfully marry nationalist rhetoric with a cleverly crafted overseas strategy, premised on the very tenets of globalisation. There seems to be a ‘pause’ in the unbalanced progress of globalisation of the last three decades—and this could have many positive outcomes

Donald_Trump_signs_Executive_Orders_January_2017 Courtesy: Wikipedia Commons
6 February 2017

Trade in the era of de-globalisation

Trump promises to reform the post World War II global order. Neelam Deo discusses how India can benefit from the changes Trump will cause in the existing trade structure as well as the transformation of trade networks in Europe after Brexit

Neelam 1 Courtesy: Gateway House
25 January 2017

How Trump will reconfigure geopolitics

Ambassador Neelam Deo delivered this speech at the grand finale of ‘The Mind Games’ – a platform for talent development & idea generation at Mahindra Partners on January 18, 2017. Ambassador Deo’s speech focuses on the disruption of the post-Cold War global framework to be caused by Trump’s foreign policy changes

Shinzō_Abe_and_Donald_Trump_(1) Courtesy: Wikipedia
16 January 2017

A more robust Asia policy expected?

Trump’s cabinet has a preponderance of China hardliners, which has wider implications for the Asia Pacific region while some of its members view Narendra Modi as Reaganesque and a man of the times

GH_5050-3-page-001 (1) Courtesy: Gateway House
22 December 2016

The year of the close vote: a 50:50 world

The year 2016 is the year of the divided electorate, so close were some of the election outcomes. Deep divisions lurk within voters coming from ostensibly “liberal” political cultures. The trend looks set to continue in the elections that will be fought in dozens of countries in 2017, where the votes could also be divided. Gateway House analyses these results through this infographic