1200px-Malabar_07-2_exercise Courtesy: Wikipedia
23 March 2017

A democratic quadrilateral in Asia?

A strategic coming together of the U.S., Japan, Australia, and India was close to fruition some years ago, impelled initially by the tsunami of 2004. The spirit of the enterprise remains alive even now, and there are many merits in India joining the quad, but such an arrangement can skew existing Asian equations, jeopardising the Act East policy

European_flags_at_European_Commission_HQ_Brussels_thumb800 Courtesy: Computer World UK
23 March 2017

EU: unity not a value anymore?

Britain will begin its formal exit process from the European Union on March 29. Signs that the European Union will survive are clear: public opinion is turning finally in its favour. The European economy has resumed creating jobs, and the unemployment rate, although still high, is steadily declining. Yet, what remains of the project is likely to have a different animus

shanghai-420380_960_720 Courtesy: Pixabay
23 March 2017

China: four-city eye opener

An opportunity to be a part of a recent think tank delegation to China offered the author insight into China’s foreign policy, development plans and issues affecting the India-China bilateral relationship. Gaps in perception that keep both countries apart must be bridged for them to leverage their emerging positions in Asia and the world

CFo1ubfUgAAzxei Courtesy: Consulate General of France in Mumbai
16 March 2017

More than a whiff of France in Bombay

All eyes are on the outcome of the French elections next month with its portents of a far right president being the people’s choice. But it was 200 years ago that Bombay forged its French connection. Trade with France ushered in cultural influences while the city’s early nationalists were drawn to the French Revolution’s political philosophy of ‘Liberty, Equality and Fraternity’

e92550d47b6d4ed5ad131f474187f8a7_18 Courtesy: Al Jazeera
6 March 2017

The Trump challenge: unpredictability as norm

Forecasting uncertainty is a full-fledged task for security and foreign policy analysts, but when countries resort to being unpredictable then it is likely to backfire. Uncertainty about his next course of action seems to be Trump’s defining characteristic. How India will manage this to better relations will be critical

India's Foreign Secretary Subrahmanyam Jaishankar (L) and US Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson Courtesy: AFP
6 March 2017

India-U.S.: continued ‘solid’ footing

Foreign Secretary Jaishankar’s third visit to the United States since Donald Trump's election is an indication of India’s commitment to engage with all-quarters in Washington with its full diplomatic might. Despite the current situation of concern due to the H-1B visa and the recent shooting of an Indian in Kansas, initial soundings are reassuring and positive.

RBI Courtesy: India.com
2 March 2017

Retreat of globalisation: central banks in the crosshairs

Central banks play a critical role in forging the country’s international economic relations. Now, with the rule-based order being reset and new regimes getting established, they are better positioned to influence the playing field. It is, therefore, critical to strengthen the Reserve Bank of India so it can drive an agenda closer to the interests of emerging countries. This will also be a test of India’s future leadership capabilities