1200px-Malabar_07-2_exercise Courtesy: Wikipedia
23 March 2017

A democratic quadrilateral in Asia?

A strategic coming together of the U.S., Japan, Australia, and India was close to fruition some years ago, impelled initially by the tsunami of 2004. The spirit of the enterprise remains alive even now, and there are many merits in India joining the quad, but such an arrangement can skew existing Asian equations, jeopardising the Act East policy

European_flags_at_European_Commission_HQ_Brussels_thumb800 Courtesy: Computer World UK
23 March 2017

EU: unity not a value anymore?

Britain will begin its formal exit process from the European Union on March 29. Signs that the European Union will survive are clear: public opinion is turning finally in its favour. The European economy has resumed creating jobs, and the unemployment rate, although still high, is steadily declining. Yet, what remains of the project is likely to have a different animus

RBI Courtesy: India.com
2 March 2017

Retreat of globalisation: central banks in the crosshairs

Central banks play a critical role in forging the country’s international economic relations. Now, with the rule-based order being reset and new regimes getting established, they are better positioned to influence the playing field. It is, therefore, critical to strengthen the Reserve Bank of India so it can drive an agenda closer to the interests of emerging countries. This will also be a test of India’s future leadership capabilities

IORA photo Courtesy: Gateway House
2 March 2017

IORA summit: sharing commonalities

The two decade-old Indian Ocean Rim Association holds its first ever summit next week. Maritime safety and security in the region is a paramount concern as also enhanced trade, but will the Blue Economy be included as a priority? Another area of concern is devising modalities for cooperation with dialogue partners, such as the United States, China and Japan

Reversal of Globalisation2 Courtesy: Systemic Alternatives
8 February 2017

Is globalisation in reverse?

The contours of globalisation are being reshaped. The Brexit vote and the election of Donald Trump mark a strong anti-globalisation sentiment even as leaders in China, India and Russia successfully marry nationalist rhetoric with a cleverly crafted overseas strategy, premised on the very tenets of globalisation. There seems to be a ‘pause’ in the unbalanced progress of globalisation of the last three decades—and this could have many positive outcomes

Donald_Trump_signs_Executive_Orders_January_2017 Courtesy: Wikipedia Commons
6 February 2017

Trade in the era of de-globalisation

Trump promises to reform the post World War II global order. Neelam Deo discusses how India can benefit from the changes Trump will cause in the existing trade structure as well as the transformation of trade networks in Europe after Brexit

china-map-of-obor-1 Courtesy: The Wire
6 February 2017

OBOR: in search of private financing

China has launched the One Belt, One Road (OBOR) Initiative in an attempt to rebuild the ancient Silk Road with proposed land and sea routes to promote infrastructure, trade, and investment in the regions that it will thus connect. The challenge will be to attract private financing to support the official and multilateral ones

28455374735_17cf79553a_b Courtesy: Flickr
31 January 2017

Saudi prince: not quite a game changer?

Prince Salman’s accession to the throne after the death of Saudi King Abdullah on 23 January 2015 has been a game changer, both domestically and in West Asian politics. Within days, he sidelined rivals within the House of Saud, and took on Iran with a confrontational policy. But two years later, the results of his new strategy disappoint